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Rapid Prompting Method (RPM)

Ethics Scenario Archive
1. Approaching Former Adult Client
2. Medical Marijuana
3. Pro Bono Work
4. Supervision Has Multiple Relationships with Family Receiving Services
5. Parent Training Concerns
6. Parents Not Implementing Procedures
7. Soliciting Parent Testimonials
8. Retaliation Towards Mandated Reporting
9. Family Rejecting Safety Measures
10. Parental Collaboration
11. Hostile Work Enviornment
12. Creating Protocol to Prevent and Treat Trauma with Limited Functional Language
13. Parent ABA Practice Questions in OT & Speech
14. Potential Gifts From Clients on Social Media
15. Helping Close Relationships With ABA Tips
16. Parent Utilizing CBD & THC
17. Client Pre-Authorization Denied For Much Needed Services
18. Supervisee Slaps Child in School Setting
19. Changing Direction of Treatment from Previous BCBA
20. BCBA Subpoenaed in Family Court
21. Terminate Services Due To Parent Behavior
22. Parents Offering Token Items During Check Out/Transition
23. Family Doesn’t Want Details Released To Funding Source Without Permission
24. Resources for IRB Approval for Independent Researchers
25. Speech Therapist Refusing To Do PECS
26. BCBA Receives Cease & Desist
27. Unlicensed, Certified BCBA Provide Supervision
28. Rapid Prompting Method (RPM)
29. Parent as Witness to Accident
30. Website Testimonials
31. Student Using Social Media Inappropriately
32. Hiring Behavior Analyst Trainees at a School District
33. College Recommendation Letter for Client
34. Connecting Families That Are Clients
35. Employer Requiring Same Number of ABA Hours for All New Clients from New BCaBA
36. Do we have any ethical guidelines regarding shared work spaces among two companies that provide similar ABA services in a private property?
37. Client Assessment & Discontinuation
38. Caseload Concerns

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Our school has been bit by RPM…HELP.  One parent went to a conference on RPM and has come back convinced that she has been undervaluing her son’s intelligence. She’s making somewhat extraordinary claims about what he is communicating with his RPM instructor, and sort of implying that we should be instructing him differently at school.  We’ve been clear that we cannot change his goals unless we see him displaying those skills at school.  In one week, we now have another family saying that they heard about it and are starting RPM as well and are “expecting a miracle.” I’m thinking about the Bridget Taylor Compassion article, and I want to ensure I don’t get on my BCBA high horse and refuse to listen. At the same time, these families want us to watch several hours of video of the student in RPM sessions and attend a conference too. Obviously, we aren’t willing to invest our time into learning about something we are opposed to.  I am trying to find the words to lovingly and respectfully help these parents to understand that there is no evidence to support this treatment and it may even be harmful.  I imagine thinking you are “hearing” your child’s voice for the first time is incredibly reinforcing, and they aren’t likely to walk away from that.  Any tips on how we can help this family, and what to say to the other families that may reach out to us about it? It seems to be spreading :/

Response

  • Codes to Consider: 1.01; 1.02; 2.09
  • Committee Input:
    • Approaching the topic in an un-biased way by finding the literature of the topic to share with families.
      • Ask questions: Address how to fade the prompts in a systematic way. Is there specific procedure or protocol available? How will this be functional?
      • discuss generalization and functionality of this mode of communication.
    • ASHA sent out statement not supporting RPM (discuss with speech therapist, family, team members etc.).
  • Exploration:
    • First watch the videos that the parents are wanting to show, then have the conversation of effective treatment and evidence-based treatment.
    • Consider conversation about prompt fading
    • Pull in the other professionals (speech, OT etc.) to be a united front/share information from varying perspectives
    • Addressing the community as a whole about communication, provide educational opportunities for families?.
    • Data collection on the student using it with different people or in different environment. There may be other data already collected on problem behaviors to show that this intervention is not benefitting the student.
    • Using the individual that has the most rapport with the family to be able to have this conversation.
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